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MMM Library

Mark Jewel

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In Canada the MMM became a part of Capitular Branch of Masonry following the formation of the grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Canada. In England the governing body is separate and sovereign namely: Grand Lodge of Mark Master Masons of England and Wales.

The Mark is the appropriate jewel of the MMM According to McCoy “the mark-masters medal or Tyrian Signet  which Hiram of Tyre is said to have sent to King Solomon was in the form of a Keystone. It had, engraved upon a circle, the emblem of an eternal compact of friendship, and a mark or devices chosen by the possessor.” Therefore, the significance of the letter’s H.T.W.S.S.T.K.S. This stone would be familiar to King Solomon as he had been fully acquainted with its intended purpose by his master architect. The Mark or Jewel of a MMM should not be confused with Mason’s Marks. The most reasonable supposition is that Mason’s Marks were adopted at a very early date, as a signature for those that could not write. As such marks can be easily made with a Chisel, they would be adopted by workers in squared stone. These Marks consisted of a combination of mechanical figures, consisting of, squares, angles, lines and perpendiculars. Therefore, when the Overseers received from unknown workmen work of a peculiar form and bearing as its mark a circle they rejected it, and threw it among the rubbish. This despite the fact that it was of singular form and beauty. King Solomon knowing that such a piece of work had been prepared had enquiry made. The Overseers, remembering the occurrence, the special stone was easily found and placed to its intended use.

In Canadian Jurisdictions the Mason’s mark is usually inscribed on a penny. Within a circle the brother engraves the design he selects. The brother must not alter or change it. It remains his mark until the day of his death.

The Mason’s Mark is not a mere ornamental appendage of the degree. It is a sacred symbol of the ties of friendship and brotherly love. When presented at any time, by the owner, to another Mark Master Mason as a pledge, it can only be redeemed at a price.

The keystone is the symbol of that close union which should exist between brethren of the same fraternity. As the operative Mason must fashion the material, so that the stones depend on each other for support, using the Keystone to bind them together. So in the construction of the Great Arch of Freemasonry, which spans the earth, we are dependant on each other for comfort, happiness and support. Most of all we rely on the keystone of charity which binds us together, brother to brother, rendering our society desirable. White is the emblem of purity. A white stone is an inestimable gift promised everyone who lives a moral and virtuous life.

In this paper there are illustrated the foundation and history of the jewel. This should impress upon the candidate, the importance of his obligation, to be ever ready to stretch forth his hand for the relief of the indigent and worthy brethren. “He, who is deaf to the sufferings of a brother, deserves no better fate then to be deprived of the blessings of hearing.” “He who is callous to the wants of his brother as to refuse to stretch forth his hand to alleviate his sufferings, deserves to have no hand to help himself.”
 

n Canada the MMM became a part of Capitular Branch of Masonry following the formation of the grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Canada. In England the governing body is separate and sovereign namely: Grand Lodge of Mark Master Masons of England and Wales.

The Mark is the appropriate jewel of the MMM According to McCoy “the mark-masters medal or Tyrian Signet  which Hiram of Tyre is said to have sent to King Solomon was in the form of a Keystone. It had, engraved upon a circle, the emblem of an eternal compact of friendship, and a mark or devices chosen by the possessor.” Therefore, the significance of the letter’s H.T.W.S.S.T.K.S. This stone would be familiar to King Solomon as he had been fully acquainted with its intended purpose by his master architect. The Mark or Jewel of a MMM should not be confused with Mason’s Marks. The most reasonable supposition is that Mason’s Marks were adopted at a very early date, as a signature for those that could not write. As such marks can be easily made with a Chisel, they would be adopted by workers in squared stone. These Marks consisted of a combination of mechanical figures, consisting of, squares, angles, lines and perpendiculars. Therefore, when the Overseers received from unknown workmen work of a peculiar form and bearing as its mark a circle they rejected it, and threw it among the rubbish. This despite the fact that it was of singular form and beauty. King Solomon knowing that such a piece of work had been prepared had enquiry made. The Overseers, remembering the occurrence, the special stone was easily found and placed to its intended use.

In Canadian Jurisdictions the Mason’s mark is usually inscribed on a penny. Within a circle the brother engraves the design he selects. The brother must not alter or change it. It remains his mark until the day of his death.

The Mason’s Mark is not a mere ornamental appendage of the degree. It is a sacred symbol of the ties of friendship and brotherly love. When presented at any time, by the owner, to another Mark Master Mason as a pledge, it can only be redeemed at a price.

The keystone is the symbol of that close union which should exist between brethren of the same fraternity. As the operative Mason must fashion the material, so that the stones depend on each other for support, using the Keystone to bind them together. So in the construction of the Great Arch of Freemasonry, which spans the earth, we are dependant on each other for comfort, happiness and support. Most of all we rely on the keystone of charity which binds us together, brother to brother, rendering our society desirable. White is the emblem of purity. A white stone is an inestimable gift promised everyone who lives a moral and virtuous life.

In this paper there are illustrated the foundation and history of the jewel. This should impress upon the candidate, the importance of his obligation, to be ever ready to stretch forth his hand for the relief of the indigent and worthy brethren. “He, who is deaf to the sufferings of a brother, deserves no better fate then to be deprived of the blessings of hearing.” “He who is callous to the wants of his brother as to refuse to stretch forth his hand to alleviate his sufferings, deserves to have no hand to help himself.”
   

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